Amazon makes it easier for Kindle owners to upload e-books they haven’t purchased from Amazon

Kindle e-readers will finally support ePub files, making it easier to load e-books not purchased from Amazon

  • Kindles traditionally only support e-books stored in their own file format
  • However, Amazon has announced that it will add support for ePub later this year
  • ePub is the most commonly used file format for e-books
  • It will make reading books not purchased from Amazon easier for Kindle owners

Amazon’s Kindles are some of the most popular e-readers on the market, but one of the biggest complaints from users is that they don’t support ePub files.

ePub is the most commonly used file format for e-books and is supported by Apple and Android devices, as well as dedicated e-readers such as Nook and Sony Reader.

However, Amazon Kindles has traditionally only supported e-books stored in their own proprietary e-book file format.

This has given rise to apps like Caliber, which claim to streamline the process of converting ePub eBooks to Amazon compatible files so they can be read on Kindle.

But it looks like Amazon has finally bowed to the pressure, announcing it will add support for ePub later this year.

Amazon's Kindles have traditionally only supported e-books stored in their own proprietary e-book file format

Amazon’s Kindles have traditionally only supported e-books stored in their own proprietary e-book file format

What is Amazon’s proprietary e-book file format?

The Kindle and ePub file format was both launched in 2007.

Although the ePub format was supported by Sony, Barnes & Noble and other e-reader manufacturers, Amazon chose to support other file formats, including Mobi, which it acquired together with the French company Mobipocket in 2005.

Amazon’s first proprietary e-book file format, AZW, was based on Mobi.

Over the years, AWZ has evolved into the KF8 / AZW3 format and now the KFX format, but they still all own the Kindle.

“Starting in late 2022, Send to Kindle applications will support the EPUB (.EPUB) format,” says Amazon on its “Send to Kindle” help page updated.

Users will be able to upload ePub e-books to their Kindles by emailing the ePub files to their device or using one of the “Send to Kindle” apps.

The Kindle is not yet able to natively load ePub files, so connecting the e-reader to a computer and manually copying the ePub files is still not an option.

However, the “Send to Kindle” service automatically converts ePubs to Kindle compatible files.

The change, first noticed by Good e-readerit will make it much easier for Kindle owners to read books they did not purchase directly from Amazon.

Publishers now sell e-books directly to consumers more regularly, often for less than Amazon and other large digital booksellers might charge.

Some smaller publishers have even made it a selling point, promising authors a larger share of the sale if customers buy directly from them.

The change also means that people who own other e-readers will be able to buy a Kindle and transfer all of their existing e-books much easier than before.

Amazon has finally bowed to the pressure, announcing it will add support for ePub later this year

Amazon has finally bowed to the pressure, announcing it will add support for ePub later this year

Amazon’s help page also points out that Amazon is planning to phase out support for sending older MOBI files via the Send to Kindle service.

MOBI is the file format that Amazon acquired together with the French company Mobipocket in 2005 and used to create its own proprietary AZW file format.

Over the years, AZW has evolved into the KF8 / AZW3 format and now the KFX format, making the older MOBI file format effectively obsolete.

“Starting in late 2022, you will no longer be able to send MOBI (.AZW, .MOBI) files to your library using Send to Kindle,” says the Amazon help page.

“This change will not affect MOBI files already in the Kindle library.

MOBI is an older file format and will not support the latest Kindle features for documents.

Leave the tablet before going to bed! Children engage more with stories if they are read from a real book, the study says

Many families with young children now own a tablet and some use it for bedtime stories or as an educational tool to help young people learn.

But a new study suggests it may be time to ditch the devices for such use, after finding children engage more with stories when read from a real book.

Researchers in the United States compared the use of tablets with traditional children’s books in a study involving 72 parents with young children between the ages of 24 and 36 months.

They found that parents talked more to their children when they read a real book to them, while children also responded more to this conversation than if they used a tablet.

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